Tag Archives: stem cells

Do stem cell researchers ignore social inequalities? – Recap of talk by Dr. Ruha Benjamin

The Talk:

People’s Science: Bodies & Rights on the Stem Cell Frontier

In Plain English:

Sociologist investigates the tensions between the stem cell research community and racial minorities and/or low-income communities

The Speaker:

Ruha Benjamin of Boston University

The Sponsor:

BU Discoveries Lecture Series

What it covered:

Dr. Ruha Benjamin, a sociologist who studies scientists and the way they interact with marginalized communities, opened her talk with a story about a bench.

Not a lab bench. A park bench. In Berkeley.

It was a nice day, and she had a few minutes to spare after giving a talk at UC-Berkeley, so she decided to try and take a nap on the park bench. She found that she couldn’t. “Tell me why,” she said, clicking to a slide with a picture of a metal park bench with three sets of arm-rest-style dividers.

“…It has bars on it?” one audience member said tentatively.

“Right. But why do you think those bars are there?” Continue reading “Do stem cell researchers ignore social inequalities? – Recap of talk by Dr. Ruha Benjamin” »

Stem Cell Science Double Feature: Reprogramming Cardiac Fibroblasts – Recap of talk by Dr. Deepak Srivastava

The Talk:

Cardiac Reprogramming: From Developmental Biology to Regeneration

In Plain English:

How to turn the heart-dwelling cells that build connective tissues into replacements for damaged heart muscle cells

The Speaker:

Dr. Deepak Srivastava, MD of UC-SF‘s Gladstone Institutes

The Sponsor:

MIT Biology Colloquium

What it covered:

Dr. Deepak Srivastava is a cardiologist who experiments with using stem cells to create replacement cells for damaged heart muscle tissue. However, while most labs try to grow replacements in petri dishes, Dr. Srivastava’s lab is working on finding a way to transform the cells that build scar tissue in the heart (the cardiac fibroblasts) into fully functional heart muscle cells.

A typical fibroblast’s job is to secrete collagen and other chemicals that help the cells in muscle and skeletal tissues stick together. If they weren’t there, your muscle cells might slide around or come apart whenever you moved. Luckily, muscle cells like to form stringy structures called sarcomeres that can contract and release. When you’re flexing your muscles, you’re actually contracting the sarcomeres and that contractile force is what causes your arm to tense up. Without the fibroblasts, the muscle cells would have a hard time aligning themselves correctly (and if one cell is even slightly out of line with its neighbor cells, the rogue cell can throw everything off), so they’re a pretty important cell group. Continue reading “Stem Cell Science Double Feature: Reprogramming Cardiac Fibroblasts – Recap of talk by Dr. Deepak Srivastava” »